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Multiculturalism        < Previous

 

Black History Timeline

 

Today's Snack: Let's have a snack that you have to TIME. Put two eggs for each student in a saucepan, or a bigger pan if you need more space. Pour water into the pan so that the water is at least one inch above the eggs. Put it on the stovetop and bring it to a boil over medium heat. Once it boils, TIME it for 2 minutes - then put the lid to the pot on, turn the heat off, and TIME it for 20 minutes. At that time, you should have hard-boiled eggs! They're great to eat with some apple juice.

 

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Note: This Treat is dedicated to the students of

Tennessee teacher Jenna Hill.

Thanks for the idea, kids!

 

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Supplies:

First, print out this Treat.

 

Next, appoint one person as the timeline chief.

No one else will have the answers, below, except this person.

The timeline chief may also go to this website and print out this list

with links to background information:

http://www.usa-people-search.com/content-milestones-in-black-history.aspx

 

Roll of paper towels | Permanent marker | Scissors

 

 

It really helps to understand the history of African-Americans in the United States if you can put the important people and events into the perspective of history.

 

So let's make a timeline, and then work together to place the faces in the spaces where they go.

 

While your timeline chief is printing out the answers, other students can cut out the faces from this Treat. They are NOT in order!

 

Another group can carefully roll out the paper towel roll just as long as it will go in the room that you are in. Do not separate the individual sheets; keep it in a long, connected roll on the floor.

 

Then take a permanent marker and write down the dates, below, in order, on the squares of paper towel. Write one date per square. You can skip a few squares to represent decades or years in which nothing happened in black history. Write the dates facing where the students will be sitting during the activity so that the dates are clearly visible toward them.

 

You might want to start on one end at the most recent date, and work your way back in time, skipping a few paper towel squares if there are a lot of years between dates. You should have at least 17 paper towel squares on the floor, and preferably more.

 

Now are you ready to play? Everybody should take one picture, and then look at the timeline with the dates in the individual paper towel squares. Go and stand on the date that you think that person is famous for.

 

If you don't have enough students, once you take a turn, you can just place the cut-out face on the square where you think it goes. Then if there are more pictures, you can do it with another one.

 

If someone gets stuck, the "timeline chief" is allowed to give one hint per person. For example, you could say "earlier" or "later."

 

When you are through, the timeline chief will correct any misplacements and go over each important date and person in Black history, to see how you did. You might have to change a few around, but that's OK. When you're "making history," things almost never work out right the first time!

 

If you have access to the Internet, the timeline chief can also follow the links in the article, above, to share more information about each famous person or event.

 

Have fun! Now, the dates are going to be in order, below, but the names and faces are not:

 

1831

 

1845

 

1850-1860

 

1863

 

1901

 

1909

 

1910

 

1931

 

1941

 

1945

 

1955

 

1957

 

1963

 

1966

 

1967

 

1995

 

2008

 

 

AND NOW FOR THE PICTURES TO BE CUT OUT:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa Parks Rosa Parks Biography

 

 

 

 

File:Booker T Washington retouched flattened-crop.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

File:Frederick Douglass portrait.jpg

 

Frederick Douglass-One of the Great Black Leaders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HERE ARE THE ANSWERS - FOR THE TIMELINE CHIEF ONLY!!!

 

 

Nat Turner's Rebellion

happened in Virginia in

1831, when a group of

rebel slaves killed from

55 to 65 white people; the

state executed 56 slaves

accused of taking part in

it, and another 100-200

blacks were killed by

mobs. The incident woke

up a lot of people about

the injustice of slavery.

 

 

File:Frederick Douglass portrait.jpg

Frederick Douglass,

great speaker, writer

and leader of the

movement to abolish

slavery; his

autobiography,

"Narrative of the Life

of Frederick Douglass,

An American Slave,"

published in 1845

 

 

 

Underground Railroad:

whites and blacks alike

snuck slaves to the North

so that they could be free,

but the brave people doing

it were risking death or prison,

1850-1860

 

 

The Emancipation Proclamation

of 1863 was when President

Abraham Lincoln declared that

slavery was wrong and all slaves

should be set free.

 

 

File:Booker T Washington retouched flattened-crop.jpg

Booker T. Washington;

educator, author and early

civil rights leader

and Tuskegee Institute

founder; autobiography,

"Up From Slavery,"

published 1901

 

 

The National Association

for the Advancement of

Colored People was

founded in 1909.

 

 

W.E.B. DuBois,

first black person to get

a Ph.D. from Harvard;

teacher; campaigned against

race prejudice with

his book, "The Crisis,"

published 1910

 

The Scottsboro Boys; in 1931, nine

black teenage boys were accused of

raping two white girls in Scottsboro, Ala.;

they were tried 3 times; 7 out of the 9 did

have to serve time, but their legal case

established that everyone, regardless of

race, deserves competent legal

representation in court, and that all-white

juries were unjust and had to stop.

 

 

Tuskegee Airmen, first African-American

aviators to serve in U.S. armed forces;

were in WWII, starting in 1941

 

 

Jackie Robinson, first black Major League

Baseball player; lettered in four sports at

UCLA; started for the Brooklyn Dodgers

in 1945; named Rookie of the Year with

12 home runs and 29 stolen bases; had

to take a lot of harassment from

prejudiced people who didn't want him

to play.

 

 

Rosa Parks Rosa Parks Biography

Rosa Parks was riding home on

the bus from her job in

Montgomery, Ala., but just

got sick of having to ride in the

back of the bus because she was

black. So one night in 1955, she

refused to give up her seat and was

arrested. But her bravery resulted

in a boycott led by Dr. Martin Luther

King, and the U.S. Supreme Court ruled

that the Montgomery bus rules were

wrong and had to stop.

 

Nine black high school students

walked in to Central High School

in Little Rock, Ark., in 1957,

racially integrating the school for

the first time; whites yelled at them

and they had to have police protection.

Previously, whites and blacks went to

separate schools.

 

The Rev. Dr. Martin

Luther King Jr., gave

one of the most powerful

speeches in American history

in 1963, "I Have a Dream,"

at the Mall in

Washington, D.C., before

250,000 people. It was probably

the biggest event of the entire

civil rights movement.

 

The Black Panther Party

was an all-black political group

that started in 1966 to protect

black neighborhoods from

police brutality; the leaders

were socialist and communist

revolutionaries, and they

had a militant and sometimes

violent attitude toward police

that made them highly

controversial.

 

 

Thurgood Marshall won the

1954 Brown vs. Board of Education

school desegregation case as a

lawyer, and later became the first

black justice on the U.S. Supreme

Court in 1967.

 

 

The Million Man March in 1995

was intended to focus the nation's

attention on the problems of black

men. It was organized by racial justice

activists; estimates of the actual

crowd ranged from 400,000 to

837,000.

 

 

Barack Obama was

elected the first

African-American

President of the

United States in

2008.

 

By Susan Darst Williams www.AfterSchoolTreats.com Multiculturalism 2011

Multiculturalism        < Previous
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