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Bottle Piano

 

Today's Snack: Since we're working with bottles today, why not have a special treat that reminds us of yesteryear: milk in a bottle! Many grocery stores offer organic milk in returnable glass bottles, and it's rich and creamy. They have flavors such as chocolate and orange, too. Pair your delicious, ice-cold bottled milk with a couple of graham crackers.

 

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Supplies:

Glass bottles or jars: same size is best, and 8 would be great

Pitcher and access to water

Masking tape

Food coloring

Thin masking tape | spoon

 

 

1.      Collect as many glass bottles or jars as you can.

 

2.      Pour different amounts of water into each jar.

 

3.      Mark the water levels of notes you like with masking tape.

 

4.      Add food coloring to make the jars look pretty.

 

5.      Tap each bottle with a spoon. Make a melody!

 

6.      Experiment. If you want a higher note, do you add more water, or pour some of the water out?

 

An "octave" is an eight-note scale that is central to most Western music. See how that word starts with an "oct-" as a prefix, the same as an octopus (eight-legged sea creature) or an octagon (eight-sided figure)? You can remember that "octave" means eight notes because of that helpful prefix.

 

It'll be challenging, but see if you can make an octave out of the different levels of water in your jars.

 

By Susan Darst Williams www.AfterSchoolTreats.com Music 02 2010

 

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